Dr. Cornelia-Adriana Baciu is DAAD-Postdoctoral Fellow at the Foreign Policy Institute, Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS), Johns Hopkins University in Washington DC, where she works in the project "United States, Europe and World Order". Her current research focuses on European and transatlantic security, foreign policy, regime complexity, Europe-NATO shifts, civil-military relations and democratic security governance. She obtained her PhD from Dublin City University. Cornelia delivered evidence on CSDP/CFSP in the Irish Senate and lectured Research Methods and Theories of International relations to BA students at DCU and to Irish Defence Forces at Maynooth University. Her research was published in international journals and open-source publications. Cornelia is affiliated with the Institute for International Conflict Resolution and Reconstruction, DCU Brexit Institute and Association pour les Études sur la guerre et la stratégie (AEGES) Paris.  

Cornelia was pre-doctoral fellow of the ZEIT-Stiftung Hamburg and worked as a Risk Analyst at a crisis management company in Konstanz. She studied Politics and European Studies in Germany, India and Romania and was DAAD-Erasmus Fellow at the Terrorism Prevention Branch, United Nations. She was awarded with the BISA Excellence in Teaching Prize, the LSRS Prize for the Best Romanian Research Student in Europe and the VEUK-Prize for her MA thesis at the University of Konstanz. 

Cornelia is founding Director of the transnational Research Network on European Security and Strategy. In 2019, her co-edited book "Peace, Security and Defence Cooperation in Post-Brexit Europe. Risks and Opportunities" was published.

RECENT POSTS

Book Launch "What Does Brexit Mean for European Security and Transatlantic Relations?"

09 October 2019 | Johns Hopkins University, SAIS, Washington DC 

This book launch seminar featured a keynote speech by the Irish Ambassador to the US, H.e. Daniel Mulhall and a Panel Discussion with experts Assist. Professor Alice Pannier (Johns Hopkins SAIS), Professor John R. Deni (US Army War College), Professor Daniel S. Hamilton (Johns Hopkins SAIS) and Erik Brattberg (Carnegie Endowment for International Peace).

This discussion focused on three major thematic axes. First, it explained why Brexit presents a security challenge to Ireland and the EU as it undermines the basis of the Northern Ireland peace process and Good Friday Agreement, creating the possibility that there will again be a closed border on the island of Ireland. Second, future UK relations with the US, NATO and European partners were evaluated more in-depth. While a ‘special relationship’ between the EU and the UK in the form of a special FPA seems less likely, there may be some possibilities to negotiate a special dialogue framework after Brexit. This however will largely depend on the EU27’s political preferences. Third, the speakers concluded by assessing future challenges and sources of instability in the European and transatlantic security order, associated with the Brexit process.

PhD Defence - "Strategies and Determinants of Civil-Military Adaptation in Insecure States"

29 July 2019 | Dublin City University

International Book Launching Seminar "Peace, Security and Defence Cooperation in Post-Brexit Europe"

13 June 2019 | Dublin City University

This book is significant because it fills a crucial scientific gap by examining key challenges as well as the impact of the Brexit a process on primary strategic aspects of peace, security and defence cooperation. The book entails contributions from internationally known researchers from London School of Economics, Hertie School of Governance in Berlin, European University Institute in Florence, Institute for European Studies in Brussels and University of Grenoble, inter alia, and contributes to a better understanding and management of anticipated challenges and sources of instability in European and international security, associated with the Brexit process.

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BISA International Teaching Prize 2019

12 June 2019 | Royal Academy | London

“Science is responsible for the progress of the society” claimed the German journalist Carl von Ossietzky, laureate of the Nobel Peace Prize in 1935; and teaching can be responsible for the production of knowledge and science, I would add. In a rapidly changing international environment in the 21st century, teaching and academic research can have a stabilising impact on societies by enabling the creation of a body of knowledge and scientific outputs which can help us to understand, explain or predict crises or instability. But how can teaching at postgraduate level be positively intertwined with completing the PhD dissertation and writing journal articles and/or books?

VIEW BISA BLOG POST

Evidence on Future Challenges to European Security

09 May 2019 | Irish Senate Chamber | Dublin

The CSDP is a domain in which some argue differentiated integration might work better. This is because states' national strategies are driven by different threat perceptions, strategic environments, capabilities and strategic interests. My research suggests that differentiated integration in the form of a role-player model in the CSDP could enhance strategic knowledge production and capability development. Security and defence collaborative regimes such as the CSDP can have an empowering effect on member states. However, an unintended consequence of the role-player model could be a "Europe à la carte" in which members would only support the policies in which they see a benefit for their own national interests.

VIEW WRITTEN EVIDENCE

The Future of European Security and Transatlantic Relations

May 2019 | Expert Strategy Workshop | Centre for War Studies, University of Southern Denmark

The Expert Scenario Workshop was organised by myself during my short-term YERUN Visiting Fellow at the Centre for War Studies, SDU. The workshop was attended by senior researchers from the University of Southern Denmark and University and Copenhagen. Three scenarios were counterfactually discussed:

•The Future of Transatlantic Relations – Scenario: US withdraws from NATO

•EU and NATO Strategies Towards Russia – Scenario: Russia asks for Eu and NATO membership.

•EU as a Global Actor: Between Power Equilibrium and a Resilient International Security Strategy – Scenario: EU announces a new grand strategy post-Brexit in response to new type of crises.

European Strategic Autonomy and Transatlantic Relations

22 October 2018 | European Union Institute, Florence

This was part of the three-day seminar on "European Security: Old Trends and New Realities", organised by the Robert Schumann Centre and the Global Governance Programme at the European Union Institute, Florence, Italy. The seminar encompassed lectures and simulations. The full programme is available here

The Interplay Between Exogenous and Endogenous Sources of Military Transformation

12-15 September 2018 | EISA Conference, University of Economics, Prague

This paper investigated the causal mechanism between exogenous and endogenous sources of institutional change and transformation of security and defence institutions in insecure states, and was part of the Panel "Civil-Military Relations and Change in Security Institutions". Details here

ECPR Panel Chair: The Future of European Security and Defence Post-Brexit

22-25 August 2018 | ECPR Conference, University of Hamburg, Germany

This Panel aimed at generating an academic discussion on security and defence transformation in Europe post-Brexit. A detailed Panel description can be found here. My paper proposed a conceptual model encompassing theoretical proportions from regime and game theory to test the level of strategic convergence between EU and UK and make predictions on the potential for future cooperation. I was also a Discussant in the Panel "Perspectives on Europe's Security and Defence Policy", details here

Security and Defence Cooperation in the 21st Century: What Issues, What Models?

26 June 2018 | Institut de Recherche Stratégique de l'Ecole Militaire, Paris

This conference attempted to conceptualize modern forms of cooperation in the matter of security and defence, such as PESCO, EU-NATO framework and bilateral agreements. My paper proposed the theory of international /transnational collaborative security and defence regimes to conceptualize new forms of security cooperation. This theory was empirically tested using Germany and Romania as case studies. The full conference programme is available here.

Multilateralism and Interdependence: Prospects and Challenges

02 May 2018 | Royal Irish Academy, Dublin

This conference discussed the challenges facing multilateral institutions and the processes of cooperation between states. My paper presented a new methodology to analyse the transformation of security, defence and foreign policy applying Ireland as a case study. The full conference programme is available here

IPSA RC44 International Conference on Military and Democratisation

04-05 July 2017 | Christchurch, New Zealand

The conference provided a platform for discussion on the changing role of the military in the contemporary world order. The presented papers focused in particular on the role of armed forces in democratisation and security.  

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Institutional Affiliation

Foreign Policy Institute

Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies

Johns Hopkins University

Washington, DC

CORNELIA'S INSTITUTIONAL PROFILE

Contact

Room B837, Bernstein Offit Building

Johns Hopkins University

1717 Massachusetts Avenue, NW

Washington DC

EMAIL